1. 25 Sep, 2019 1 commit
  2. 24 Sep, 2019 10 commits
  3. 11 Sep, 2019 2 commits
    • Miguel Ojeda's avatar
      Compiler Attributes: add support for __copy (gcc >= 9) · 44ea70c1
      Miguel Ojeda authored
      commit c0d9782f upstream.
      
      From the GCC manual:
      
        copy
        copy(function)
      
          The copy attribute applies the set of attributes with which function
          has been declared to the declaration of the function to which
          the attribute is applied. The attribute is designed for libraries
          that define aliases or function resolvers that are expected
          to specify the same set of attributes as their targets. The copy
          attribute can be used with functions, variables, or types. However,
          the kind of symbol to which the attribute is applied (either
          function or variable) must match the kind of symbol to which
          the argument refers. The copy attribute copies only syntactic and
          semantic attributes but not attributes that affect a symbol’s
          linkage or visibility such as alias, visibility, or weak.
          The deprecated attribute is also not copied.
      
        https://gcc.gnu.org/onlinedocs/gcc/Common-Function-Attributes.html
      
      The upcoming GCC 9 release extends the -Wmissing-attributes warnings
      (enabled by -Wall) to C and aliases: it warns when particular function
      attributes are missing in the aliases but not in their target, e.g.:
      
          void __cold f(void) {}
          void __alias("f") g(void);
      
      diagnoses:
      
          warning: 'g' specifies less restrictive attribute than
          its target 'f': 'cold' [-Wmissing-attributes]
      
      Using __copy(f) we can copy the __cold attribute from f to g:
      
          void __cold f(void) {}
          void __copy(f) __alias("f") g(void);
      
      This attribute is most useful to deal with situations where an alias
      is declared but we don't know the exact attributes the target has.
      
      For instance, in the kernel, the widely used module_init/exit macros
      define the init/cleanup_module aliases, but those cannot be marked
      always as __init/__exit since some modules do not have their
      functions marked as such.
      Suggested-by: default avatarMartin Sebor <msebor@gcc.gnu.org>
      Reviewed-by: default avatarNick Desaulniers <ndesaulniers@google.com>
      Signed-off-by: default avatarMiguel Ojeda <miguel.ojeda.sandonis@gmail.com>
      Signed-off-by: default avatarStefan Agner <stefan@agner.ch>
      Signed-off-by: default avatarGreg Kroah-Hartman <gregkh@linuxfoundation.org>
      44ea70c1
    • Miguel Ojeda's avatar
      include/linux/module.h: copy __init/__exit attrs to init/cleanup_module · 85f8197a
      Miguel Ojeda authored
      commit a6e60d84 upstream.
      
      The upcoming GCC 9 release extends the -Wmissing-attributes warnings
      (enabled by -Wall) to C and aliases: it warns when particular function
      attributes are missing in the aliases but not in their target.
      
      In particular, it triggers for all the init/cleanup_module
      aliases in the kernel (defined by the module_init/exit macros),
      ending up being very noisy.
      
      These aliases point to the __init/__exit functions of a module,
      which are defined as __cold (among other attributes). However,
      the aliases themselves do not have the __cold attribute.
      
      Since the compiler behaves differently when compiling a __cold
      function as well as when compiling paths leading to calls
      to __cold functions, the warning is trying to point out
      the possibly-forgotten attribute in the alias.
      
      In order to keep the warning enabled, we decided to silence
      this case. Ideally, we would mark the aliases directly
      as __init/__exit. However, there are currently around 132 modules
      in the kernel which are missing __init/__exit in their init/cleanup
      functions (either because they are missing, or for other reasons,
      e.g. the functions being called from somewhere else); and
      a section mismatch is a hard error.
      
      A conservative alternative was to mark the aliases as __cold only.
      However, since we would like to eventually enforce __init/__exit
      to be always marked,  we chose to use the new __copy function
      attribute (introduced by GCC 9 as well to deal with this).
      With it, we copy the attributes used by the target functions
      into the aliases. This way, functions that were not marked
      as __init/__exit won't have their aliases marked either,
      and therefore there won't be a section mismatch.
      
      Note that the warning would go away marking either the extern
      declaration, the definition, or both. However, we only mark
      the definition of the alias, since we do not want callers
      (which only see the declaration) to be compiled as if the function
      was __cold (and therefore the paths leading to those calls
      would be assumed to be unlikely).
      
      Link: https://lore.kernel.org/lkml/20190123173707.GA16603@gmail.com/
      Link: https://lore.kernel.org/lkml/20190206175627.GA20399@gmail.com/Suggested-by: default avatarMartin Sebor <msebor@gcc.gnu.org>
      Acked-by: default avatarJessica Yu <jeyu@kernel.org>
      Signed-off-by: default avatarMiguel Ojeda <miguel.ojeda.sandonis@gmail.com>
      Signed-off-by: default avatarStefan Agner <stefan@agner.ch>
      Signed-off-by: default avatarGreg Kroah-Hartman <gregkh@linuxfoundation.org>
      85f8197a
  4. 10 Sep, 2019 10 commits
  5. 02 Sep, 2019 17 commits